Most Popular Articles

  • Ethio 7 Days Entertainment 2015

     Before & after the game during Ethiopian Soccer Tournament June 28 - July 4th 2015, Minew Shewa Etnertainment  are Hosting "Ethio 7 days Entertainment" indoor Festival will provided a full entertainment, comedy, concert, fashion, traditional artifacts and authentic food and many more @ the world famous "Coco Cabana" located in the intersection of University blvd & Riggs rd 2031A University Blvd E, Hyattsville, MD 20783.

     

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  • Line-up for Smile Addis Music Concert 2016

    Jr Music Production, A Plus Events and Promotion and Negus Entertainment presents "Smile Addis Music Concert" featuring Zeritu Kebede, Dawit Melese, Jonny Ragga, Dan Admasu, Girma Beyene and Bahita Gebrehiwot.

    Mehari Brothers band, DJ Dagi and up-and-coming talents Tsedey, Betty, Yoyo and Etcho will also be performing.

    Smile Addis Concert 2016

     

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  • ESFNA Ethiopian Music Concerts 2015

    Ethiopian Sports Federation in North America (ESFNA) proudly presents its event lineup for its 32nd Annual Sports and Cultural Event to be held in the D.C./Maryland/Virginia area from June 28 to July 4, 2015.

    As part of this huge event there will be three Ethiopian music concerts. Ethiopian music stars performing include Teddy Afro, Gossaye Tesfaye, Aster Aweke, Birhanu Tezera, Hibest Turuneh, Jacky Gosee and many more.

     

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  • Ethiopia's Jano Band talks new album

    Jano Band became the first Ethiopian band to feature on Coke Studio Africa when they collaborated with South African singer Shekhinah in Nairobi, Kenya, last year. 

    The band – which consists of two female vocalists, two male lead vocalists and six musicians on bass, guitars, keyboards and drums – was brought together by Addis Gessesse in 2011.

    Since the release of Ertale in 2012, the group has collaborated and worked with American producer Bill Laswell who helped the group sparkle on the international arena.

    In September last year, news broke that the band was on the verge of a breakup. The band disputed the reports through its current manager Sammy Tefera who went on to announce that the band would be launching its second album in early 2018.

    Music In Africa caught up with one of the band’s lead vocalists, Dibekulu Tafesse, to talk about their 16-track album, Lerasih New, which was released on 1 February.

    Read the full story on musicinafrica

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  • Two Ethiopian Music Legends Bring Ethiopian Jazz and Funk to Los Angeles

    For many people outside of the Habesha community, their first experience with Ethiopian music came from the soundtrack of a Bill Murray movie. That movie, 2005’s Broken Flowers, concerns Murray’s character trying to make contact with an adult son of his who may or may not exist. In the movie, Murray’s character is helped on his journey by his neighbor, played by Jeffrey Wright, who not only plans out Murray’s quest, but maybe most importantly, provides him with a soundtrack in the form of a playlist on a burnt CD consisting mostly of the elegantly fidgety Ethiopian funk of vibraphonist and pianist Mulatu Astatke. The music, funky, with hard drum breaks, soil deep bass lines, hauntingly melancholic brass solos, steady keyboard vamps that break out into wistful sentiments, and the occasional reverb heavy wah wah guitar rejoinder, is an essential element in constructing the mood and emotional ambiance of the movie, so much so that the director, Jim Jarmusch, makes a point to show a large portrait of Mulatu Astatke in the home of Jeffrey Wright’s character.

    “It was a revolutionary time for music in Ethiopia” says Hailu Mergia, a Ethiopian pianist and accordionist, describing the late 1960s and early 1970s in the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa during the time period that both he and Mulatu Astatke were making music. “Before the late 1960s, there weren’t too many nightclubs in Addis, but in the late ’60s, a lot more clubs started to open, and a lot of musicians started to come out to play,” Hailu goes on to say, “everybody was trying to play with a band. I call it the ‘Band Era.’’’

    Read full story at ocweekly

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